KirkjubøurAre you planning to head to Faroe Islands in September? What can you expect of the weather in the Faroe Islands in September? How many daylight hours are there for exploring the islands? What are the main things to do and sights to see during this early autumn month? Read on to learn everything you need to know about Faroe Islands in September.



September is a fabulous month for those yearning to explore the secluded Faroe Islands. The autumn in Faroe Islands will slowly roll in and the magical colours of the Arctic grass carpet on the mountains will start to show. In early September everything is still lush green but will softly transform to colours of yellow, orange and red as the bright evenings of summer are taken over by the darker nights of autumn.

Faroe Islands in September is perfect for those who want to slow down a little. A wealth of tours are still running and you will also get lots of opportunities to discover some of the under-the-radar gems and offbeat villages in the countryside such as Tjørnuvík and Funningur that have been left totally untouched by time. Here are the best things for you to pin to your Faroe Islands September itinerary.

Faroe Islands exudes a hidden class that beguiles all senses in September and offers visitors a unique experience. This month will add that special extra touch to your vacation. The exciting range of excursions put you in the very heart of this undiscovered destination.

September is the first month of the calm autumn palette and throughout the month the days will become shorter but you will still have plenty of daylight for exploring before the sun vanishes over the horizon. The days are a bit colder too but winter has yet to settle in and there is still no snow in the mountains. 

Driving in Faroe Islands in September

Diving Faroe Islands

The Faroe Islands gives travellers the freedom to make their own discoveries across the archipelago. September in the Faroe Islands is no exception. Exploring the different islands on your own terms by driving yourself makes the perfect way to uncover what the Faroe Islands are like in September.

All roads are open and accessible making even the most remote villages such as Gjógv easily reachable. So make sure to discover some of the many unspoiled sights that lie of the beaten path. 

The main thing to watch out for on the roads are sheep. You will find Faroese sheep on all 18 island where they roam free throughout the year grazing in wilderness but also crossing roads every now and then. So if you are driving in the countryside, make sure to keep an eye out for the omnipresent sheep.

You can discover half of the islands by car. The most popular islands will get you from the airport, to the capital, and to the highest mountain in the country. These are the islands that you can explore in a car.


  • Vágar island (where you will find the only airport) 
  • Streymoy island (home to the capital, Tórshavn)
  • Eysturoy island (with the talles mountain Slættaratindur)
  • Borðoy (here you will find the fishing town, Klaksvík)
  • Viðoy (home to the epic village Viðareiði)
  • Kunoy (steep island with lots of mountains)
  • Kalsoy (20 minutes ferry ride from Klaksvík)
  • Sandoy (40 ferry ride from Gamlarætt on Streymoy island)
  • Suðuroy (2 hours ferry ride from Tórshavn)

No matter which islands you decide to visit, you will experience timeless villages and undulating sceneries. Make sure to take yourself time and soak in the atmosphere across the islands.

Unless the magical snow arrives early, all roads in Faroe Islands are open until late November. The most common road to be shut down for the winter is the road from Eiði to Gjógv on Eysturoy island.

Things to see and do in Faroe Islands in September

Car Map Faroe IslandsYou will enjoy riding the roads in the Faroe Islands. The are some 600 km of roads connecting the different villages and small cities.

Faroe Islands still boasts the same amazing landscapes in September. Most of the best summer activities are still in operation even though the puffins have left for the season. You will need to plan ahead if you want to travel to the Vestmanna Bird Cliffs as this is the most coveted attraction. 

September is the last month in the season where you can jump on-board one of the boats to the Vestmanna Sea Cliffs where you will have a up-close view of the stunning sea cliffs. Weather permitting, you will enter almost complete darkness when sailing into some of the large sea arch.

MúlafossurThe unbelievable Múlafossur waterfall with the village Gásadalur as a backdrop. Picture of this sunset is taken on 9 September. Photo by Christian Koch.

Visiting the serene village Gásadalur is an essential part of a true Faroe Islands experience. Make sure to indulge in the untouched scenery in the iconic cinematic village Gásadalur.

The village sits against a backdrop of pure majesty. The steam in the village gently drifts to its final point flowing straight into the Atlantic Ocean. This is the famous and unique Múlafossur Waterfall

You can moor in the village for the night at Gásadalsgarður hostel. For a chance to experience the village Gásadalur in depth, a guided day tour is just the thing. Some tours are made in coaches, some in small group vehicles and some in private cars.



This time of year there are a number of unmissable Faroese activities and sceneries like traversing the sightseeing route to the villages Viðareiði and Kvívík, doing a boat tour, rappelling in Eysturoy for adventure seekers, and enjoying Tórshavn and some of the great things that the capital city has to offer.

Tórshavn is always an alluring base from which to explore the different islands. Most travellers stay in Tórshavn during their vacation here.

One of the more unknown islands is Suðuroy offering some of the finest sceneries in the Faroe Islands. One of the most beautiful landmark here is the attractive panoramic view from the lighthouse in Akraberg that lies majestically at the southernmost end of the Faroe Islands. 



Sumba is the southernmost village in the Faroe Islands. Here you will find small houses in marvellous colours just before you get to Akrabyrgi.

September is a pedal-friendly month where you can bicycle throughout the country slow and steady. There are great guided tours departing from Tórshavn. 

The tour guide has mapped out some of the most epic road routes in the Faroe Islands which you can tackle. You can spend the time whizzing around some of the most popular sights on a comfortable saddle.

While you are on the road, you can stop and start to look for crowberries. Picking these berries is free and they grow in moss and grass-covered areas everywhere on the islands. Being out picking berries in untouched nature ads a down-to-earth feel to your journey and will fill you with calmness. The berries are fresh but bitter. 

Faroe Islands weather in September

Akraberg LighthouseThe lighthouse at Akraberg. This is the southernmost point in the Faroe Islands.

The average day temperature in September is 9° C (48° F). Snow is very unlikely. The temperature will be quit stable never getting below 5° C and above 15° C.

Expect hoovering wind to blow in your face while you are out immersing yourself in the wilderness. Rain can from time to time drop almost horizontally and waterfalls along the mountains might just as well flow upward than drop down.

Now, remember to pack wind protected clothes and warm layers. This will make your Faroe Islands experience so much more enjoyable. You will have plenty of daylight to explore those things on your bucket list as there are more than 14 hours of light in the beginning of September. When the month draws to a close, there are 11.5 hours of daylight.

 Sunrise TimeSunset TimeHours of Light
September 1st06.1720.3514 hrs 17 mins
September 30st07.3219.0011 hrs 27 mins


If you enjoy fantastic panorama views of the rolling meadows, get busy arranging your September visit to the Faroe Islands today. You will experience waterfalls like nowhere else and beautiful villages tucked away in the deep valleys.

Would you like to travel to Faroe Islands in September? What would be on the top of your bucket-list? Pick crowberries, visit Gásadalur or just relax in Tórshavn?